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  • IETF 116 Yokohama registration now open

    Registration is now open for IETF 116 Yokohama

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    24 Nov 2022
  • IETF 115 post-meeting survey

    IETF 115 London was held 5-11 November 2022

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    22 Nov 2022
  • Catching up on IETF 115

    Recordings are now available for sessions held during the IETF 115 meeting and the IETF Hackathon, where more than 1500 participants gathered in London and online 5-11 November 2022.

      13 Nov 2022
    • Opportunities for university researchers and students during IETF 115

      The upcoming IETF 115 meeting in London on 5-11 November 2022 is a unique opportunity for networking researchers to learn how RFCs are written, to engage with the Internet standards community to begin to develop research impact, and to meet more than 1,000 leading technologists from around the world currently working in industry, academia, and other organizations.

        1 Nov 2022
      • Suggested IETF 115 Sessions for Getting Familiar with New Topics

        These IETF 115 meeting sessions are likely to include discussions and new proposals that are accessible to a broad range of Internet technologists whether they are new to the IETF or long-time participants.

          24 Oct 2022

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        Filter by topic and date

        New TLDs

          3 Apr 2014

          The previous blog post talked about the IANA discussions at the ICANN meeting. But of course that was not the only topic that we talked about.

          The biggest project in the last couple of years at ICANN has been the introduction of new TLDs. Those are new finally coming online, and include both new ASCII-based names as well as many internationalized domain names. The latter are, of course, very important for the worldwide users of the Internet.

          Having talked to some of the people about their experiences in bringing such new TLDs to use, we realised that there are some technical barriers in using them in some applications. And we wanted to highlight one of those barriers in this post, in the hope that additional implementors notice these issues and make sure that the new TLDs work in all current systems.

          The barrier we want to highlight is that some applications expect only the set of TLDs that were in use before this recent expansion, and do not accept (or do not properly handle) the new TLDs in URIs, email addresses, and other places that domain names appear. This is a problem that touches different types of applications and web services.

          For instance, many browsers employ mechanisms to recognize proper domain names, and use internal logic to recognize valid TLDs. The results of such recognition processes is used for things such as determining whether a string typed in the URL bar should be fed to the domain name system or to a search engine. In some cases, today’s browsers are unaware of the full set of possible TLDs, and may refuse to do a domain name query, instead assuming that the user entered a search.

          Of course, the relevant developers have been notified of known issues, and fixes are on the way, but there may be issues that we have not run into yet. For further information, see also ICANN’s Universal Acceptance Project.

          As time goes by, many more of these domains come online. Any discovered problems will be detected and corrected. But sooner the better. With this in mind, check your code today!


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