Skip to main content
  • IETF 119 post-meeting survey

    IETF 119 Brisbane was held 16-22 March 2024 and the results of the post-meeting survey are now available on a web-based interactive dashboard.

    12 Apr 2024
  • New working group aims to make spotting unwanted trackers easier

    Location-tracking accessories provide numerous benefits to users, such as being able to find where they left their keys. But they can also have security and privacy implications if used for malicious purposes. A newly formed IETF working group has taken on the task to standardize a protocol that protects people against being unknowingly tracked.

    14 Mar 2024
  • New Internet Architecture Board, IETF Trust, IETF LLC and Internet Engineering Task Force Leadership Announced

    Members of the incoming Internet Architecture Board (IAB), the IETF Trust, the IETF Administration LLC (IETF LLC) Board of Directors, and the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG)—which provides leadership for the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)—have been officially announced, with new members selected by the 2023-2024 IETF Nominating Committee.

    12 Mar 2024
  • IAB Workshop on Barriers to Internet Access of Services (BIAS)

    The Internet Architecture Board (IAB) organizes workshops about topics of interest to the community that bring diverse experts together, raise awareness, and possibly identify the next steps that can be explored by the community. The IAB held its “Barriers for Internet Access of Services (Bias)” fully online workshop during the week of January 15, 2024.

    5 Mar 2024
  • Suggested IETF 119 Sessions for Getting Familiar with New Topics

    These IETF 119 meeting sessions included discussions and proposals that are accessible to a broad range of Internet technologists whether they are new to the IETF or long-time participants.

    26 Feb 2024

Filter by topic and date

Filter by topic and date

Non-Technical Trends Affecting the IETF

1 Mar 2016

This blog post is not about technology. A while ago I asked for volunteers to help us understand some of the non-technical changes around the IETF.

Second Life Screenshot

Some of these changes may affect how we should run our operations: changing participation, changing forms of co-operation, changing landscapes in the area of standards organisations, open source, and so on.

My goal was to set up a design team. This effort was inspired by involvement in various decisions that the IETF leadership has to take part in. I find myself often wishing to be able to draw more on the understanding trends and their impact on the IETF.

Alia Atlas, Avri Doria, Tobias Gondrom, Olaf Kolkman, Steve Olshansky, Benson Schliesser, Robert Sparks, Russ White joined the team (thank you!) and the first result from the team is now available as an Internet Draft.

You can read the full draft here, but I have copied some words from the abstract below:

While most of the work in the IETF is technical, the IETF should and does regularly examine itself, including its processes and goals, to determine if the technical community is truly serving the larger network engineering community effectively. Changes in this area tend to be incremental, as is fitting for an organization with decades of experience and history in developing and managing the process of building technical specifications.

The rapid and ongoing changes in the world have recently caused a number of IETF participants to examine the current processes and operation of the IETF, particularly in the context of the culture of the IETF. This memo discusses some cultural and global trends in relation to the IETF’s operating environment, how these trends might affect the operation of the IETF, and notes some topics for further exploration.

This memo is also input for discussion that the IETF community should have.

The memo has no particular official standing, nor does it claim to represent more than the authors’ thinking at the time of writing.

But our opinion is just that — our opinion. What do you all in the IETF community think about this? What changes do you foresee? Please direct discussion about this topic to the ietf@ietf.org mailing list.

As a side note, if you are interested in the picture, it is of an IESG meeting in 2010, held in Second Life. The setup was pioneered by Lisa Dusseault. And at least for me, the experience far surpassed phone conferences, at least as good as today’s high-quality Internet conference calls can be. The IETF also had its own island in Second Life. Where can we take the IESG or the IETF in 2016?


Share this page