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  • IETF 111 Hackathon: Coding across time zones

    The IETF 111 Hackathon was held July 19-23, 2021. This was the 19th IETF Hackathon, and the 4th held as an online only event. For most people involved in the IETF the past several years, the IETF Hackathon marks the start of each IETF meeting.

    • Charles EckelIETF Hackathon Co-chair
    8 Sep 2021
  • IETF 111 post-meeting survey

    The results from our IETF 111 post-meeting survey are now available.

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    23 Aug 2021
  • IETF Community Survey 2021

    In May 2021, the IETF Administration LLC (IETF LLC) on behalf of the IESG and in collaboration with the IAB distributed the first annual IETF community survey to all 56,000 addresses subscribed to IETF mailing lists. Its purpose was "To help better understand our community and its makeup, gather views on the IETF and how well it works for participants, and gain insight into how we compare to similar organisations".

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    11 Aug 2021
  • Experiences from the first fully-online IAB workshop on Network Impacts of COVID-19

    The Internet Architecture Board (IAB) held its first fully-online workshop in November 2019, just before the IETF 109 meeting, to discuss the network impacts of the COVID-19 crisis.

    • Mirja KühlewindIAB Chair
    23 Jul 2021
  • Applied Networking Research Prize presentations at IETF 111

    Presentations on research into network specification and verification and on low-latency video streaming will be featured during the Internet Research Task Force Open session of the IETF 111 Online meeting scheduled for 26-30 July.

      22 Jul 2021

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    University Students Create Running Code for the Internet

    • Greg Wood

    14 Mar 2017

    IETF Hackathons embody the IETF’s tradition of running code—testing theories against the realties of implementation, with a goal of accelerating the definition and adoption of protocols and technologies that make the Internet work better.

    One of the best things about theses events is the shared success of a broad range of participants, from long-time IETF contributors to those who have never attended an IETF meeting or joined an IETF working group. Of particular note, university students from around the world have been remarkable contributors at the past few hackathons.

    IETF Hackathon Panorama
    IETF Hackathon Panorama, November 2016

    At the most recent IETF Hackathon in Seoul, a team from Sungkyunkwan University worked on implementations of the specifications being defined with the Interface to Network Security Function (I2NSF) Working Group. Powered by energetic professors and students from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea, the team used RESTCONF and NETCONF together with YANG data models to implement network security services using OpenDaylight and mininet. In doing so, they validated the approach defined by the IETF’s I2NSF Working Group.


    Team from Sungkyunkwan University IETF Hackathon at IETF 97
    Team from Sungkyunkwan University IETF Hackathon at IETF 97

    Charles Eckel, an Open Source Developer Evangelist for Cisco DevNet, who has led the IETF Hackathons over the past few years, has witnessed first hand how teams with a diverse set of participants often leads to impressive results. Eckel commented, “The most successful hackathon teams are those with a good mix of participants with different skillsets. When you combine IETF newcomers with great coding skills with IETF veterans with tremendous knowledge of evolving Internet protocols—that’s where the magic happens.”

    IETF Hackathons provide students with unique learning opportunities as well. Eckel observes, “The mentoring and teamwork that comes from working closely with a group of people on a focused effort over the course of two days is a rich and valuable experience that you are not likely to get merely by reading a few drafts and attending a handful of meetings.”

    On numerous occasions, even the hurdle of geography has been cleared by hackathon participants. For example, Ecole Polytechnique de Louvain in Belgium organized two teams working on Multipath TCP during the IETF 97 Hackathon in Seoul. Five participants in Seoul, including three PhD students, worked with 25 students in Louvain-la-Neuve on a new socket API that allows application developers to more easily make use of multipath TCP subflows. Together, the teams received the Best Overall award for the hackathon.

    The result confirms Eckel conclusion that, “IETF Hackathons are great events for both long-time IETFers and well as newcomers. “

    The next IETF Hackathon will be held in Chicago on 25-26 March 2017. As Eckel notes, “For someone with coding skills and an interest in working on the Internet, IETF Hackathons provide opportunities to get plugged into a project and immediately start producing tangible results.”

    For more information, and details about participation, see: https://www.ietf.org/hackathon/


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