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  • IETF 116 Yokohama registration now open

    Registration is now open for IETF 116 Yokohama

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    24 Nov 2022
  • IETF 115 post-meeting survey

    IETF 115 London was held 5-11 November 2022

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    22 Nov 2022
  • Catching up on IETF 115

    Recordings are now available for sessions held during the IETF 115 meeting and the IETF Hackathon, where more than 1500 participants gathered in London and online 5-11 November 2022.

      13 Nov 2022
    • Opportunities for university researchers and students during IETF 115

      The upcoming IETF 115 meeting in London on 5-11 November 2022 is a unique opportunity for networking researchers to learn how RFCs are written, to engage with the Internet standards community to begin to develop research impact, and to meet more than 1,000 leading technologists from around the world currently working in industry, academia, and other organizations.

        1 Nov 2022
      • Suggested IETF 115 Sessions for Getting Familiar with New Topics

        These IETF 115 meeting sessions are likely to include discussions and new proposals that are accessible to a broad range of Internet technologists whether they are new to the IETF or long-time participants.

          24 Oct 2022

        Filter by topic and date

        Filter by topic and date

        We Will Strengthen the Internet

        • Jari ArkkoIETF Chair

        8 Nov 2013

        Wow. What a week!

        Working with Internet technology often involves details deep inside the technology. But it seems that this week has been a perfect storm of highly visible and important technical developments: A major upgrade to HTTP, the basis of all web communications. Work on future transport protocols, including proposals to add security directly to TCP. Discussing the choice of technology for making video calls directly in Web browsers without plug-ins.

        And, of course, mass Internet surveillance. This was clearly the discussion that has received most attention at the IETF-88 meeting. What can we do about improving the situation? And should we? As the end of the meeting draws closer, I wanted to summarise where we are and what we are going to do.

        IETF Security Area Director Stephen Farrell said that pervasive surveillance represents an attack on the Internet. And the rest of us agree. Such pervasive surveillance requires the monitoring party to take actions that are indistinguishable from an attack on Internet communications. So we are willing to work to address it, just like any other threat. Many working groups that I went to were addressing this topic in one way or the another, reviewing application by application, doing careful work to understand what options we have to improve security, and weighing the various trade-offs in different designs. As Stephen says: “While there are challenges isolating the specific areas of attack that IETF protocols can mitigate, all of the working groups that considered the topic have started planning to address the threat using IETF tools that can mitigate aspects of the problem.” In many cases, privacy against pervasive monitoring was considered on an equal footing with other security issues for the first time.

        What happens next? I want to be clear that this is a long-term effort. Not a reaction to specific revelations, but a wholesale upgrade to our view what the threats in the Internet are and how they need to be addressed. And the updates will be hard work.  And technology does not have solutions for all problems. But we will be working on general IETF-wide principles on how to address the new threats, thinking about the ways to use technologies such as TLS or opportunistic encryption. And, we will be working on the specific protocols and application areas (HTTP, XMPP, etc). Of course, all this work will be done in an open manner, with broad participation and review, which is the way we work at the IETF. I would like to invite everyone to join the effort!

        I was also very glad to see a lot of attention in the press for our efforts, including beyond the technical media (e.g., Economist). This underscores the broad visibility of this issue, and the importance Internet users place on our efforts to address it. Not to mention social media. For the first time we have had more people watch our meeting remotely on YouTube than onsite. Countless tweets went out on the #IETF88 hashtag.

        Finally, I would claim that if there is a one video about Internet security that you watch this year, I think it should be this one: the IETF-88 technical plenary video. Do share the video with your friends and colleagues!


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