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  • Suggested IETF 119 Sessions for Getting Familiar with New Topics

    These IETF 119 meeting sessions included discussions and proposals that are accessible to a broad range of Internet technologists whether they are new to the IETF or long-time participants.

      26 Feb 2024
    • Google and consortium of local organizations to host first Australian IETF meeting in over 20 years

      Google, auDA, and Internet Association Australia (IAA) provide key support for Brisbane meeting to be held 16-22 March 2024

        23 Feb 2024
      • JSONPath: from blog post to RFC in 17 years

        Today the JSONPath RFC (RFC 9535) proposed standard was published, precisely 17 years after Stefan Gössner wrote his influential blog post JSONPath – XPath for JSON that resulted in some 50 implementations in various languages.

        • Glyn NormingtonRFC 9535 Editor
        21 Feb 2024
      • Stepping towards a Sustainable Internet

        The IAB’s new Environmental Impacts of Internet Technology (E-Impact) program will hold its first virtual interim meeting over two slots on 15 and 16 February 2024. These interim meetings are open to participation, and we invite all interested community members to join, participate, and contribute.

        • Jari ArkkoE-Impact Program Lead
        • Suresh KrishnanE-Impact Program Lead
        7 Feb 2024
      • What’s the deal with Media Over QUIC?

        In 2022, the IETF formed a working group for Media Over QUIC (MoQ)—a media delivery solution that has the potential to transform how we send and receive media during live streaming, real-time collaboration, gaming, and more.

        • Brett BralleyThought Leadership Content Writer, Cisco
        25 Jan 2024

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      WebRTC: Marking a milestone in real-time communications

      • Alissa CooperIETF Chair

      27 Jan 2021

      The publication of the standards that provide a foundation for Web Real-Time Communications (WebRTC) marks a milestone in the development of conferencing services used by billions of people around the world.

      More than a decade ago, when rich web applications were in their infancy, engineers from across the web and real-time communications industries came together to tackle a challenging problem: could modern voice and video over IP technology be brought to the ubiquitous platform of the Web?

      The task was daunting. Real-time communications involved complicated protocol mechanics and network address translation (NAT) traversal machinery, while the Web lacked the APIs and security model needed to safely effectuate two-way real-time communications. But the idea of being able to make a video call in your browser at the click of a button presented nearly limitless possibilities for collaboration, connection, and productivity. 

      That idea has become a reality for billions of users around the world thanks to years of intensive work to standardize WebRTC in the IETF and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Last week, the IETF published a set of 50 specifications (comprising the bulk of RFCs published in January) that define the core WebRTC protocol stack together with several other protocols that use WebRTC building blocks. Earlier this week, the W3C published WebRTC 1.0, the web APIs that makes browser-to-browser calls possible. Even prior to the finalization of these specifications—years prior, in fact—WebRTC technologies were being deployed and used as part of most modern services that use voice or video, including many that do not involve web browsers. The availability of WebRTC code, APIs, and standards has made it simple to add real-time communications functionality to any application. And that widespread availability has been a true lifeline during the COVID-19 pandemic.  

      There is already work underway to extend WebRTC. The IETF WebTransport (WEBTRANS) work is aiming to build out additional web support for a variety of transport properties. The WebRTC Ingest Signaling over HTTPS (WISH) work is focusing on the development of a protocol to support one-way WebRTC-based audiovisual sessions between broadcasting tools and real-time media broadcast networks. Similar work to expand the use cases of WebRTC is ongoing in the W3C.

      Finishing the core WebRTC standards required tremendous effort from dozens of IETF and W3C participants over many years. The end result is a hugely popular technology suite that fulfills the Internet’s central promise—connecting people—on a global scale every day. It will be exciting to see what the future holds as the IETF community continues to build on this success.


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