From nobody Fri Sep 29 03:00:37 2017 Return-Path: X-Original-To: privsec-discuss@ietfa.amsl.com Delivered-To: privsec-discuss@ietfa.amsl.com Received: from localhost (localhost [127.0.0.1]) by ietfa.amsl.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id 3DBC913219B; Fri, 29 Sep 2017 03:00:30 -0700 (PDT) X-Virus-Scanned: amavisd-new at amsl.com X-Spam-Flag: NO X-Spam-Score: -1.899 X-Spam-Level: X-Spam-Status: No, score=-1.899 tagged_above=-999 required=5 tests=[BAYES_00=-1.9, HTML_MESSAGE=0.001] autolearn=ham autolearn_force=no Received: from mail.ietf.org ([4.31.198.44]) by localhost (ietfa.amsl.com [127.0.0.1]) (amavisd-new, port 10024) with ESMTP id Zv9XPZatkQxP; Fri, 29 Sep 2017 03:00:27 -0700 (PDT) Received: from p130.piuha.net (p130.piuha.net [193.234.218.130]) by ietfa.amsl.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id E2FB613209C; Fri, 29 Sep 2017 03:00:26 -0700 (PDT) Received: from localhost (localhost [127.0.0.1]) by p130.piuha.net (Postfix) with ESMTP id 604262CE21; Fri, 29 Sep 2017 13:00:24 +0300 (EEST) (envelope-from jari.arkko@piuha.net) X-Virus-Scanned: amavisd-new at piuha.net Received: from p130.piuha.net ([127.0.0.1]) by localhost (p130.piuha.net [127.0.0.1]) (amavisd-new, port 10024) with ESMTP id 0fYo2jyO7qWh; Fri, 29 Sep 2017 13:00:22 +0300 (EEST) Received: from [127.0.0.1] (p130.piuha.net [IPv6:2001:14b8:1829::130]) by p130.piuha.net (Postfix) with ESMTPS id 846722CC9B; Fri, 29 Sep 2017 13:00:22 +0300 (EEST) (envelope-from jari.arkko@piuha.net) From: Jari Arkko Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="Apple-Mail=_F57FCD3F-26CD-4347-B7BD-5B9761265289" Mime-Version: 1.0 (Mac OS X Mail 10.3 \(3273\)) Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2017 12:00:21 +0200 References: <3F737F0E-9834-4469-9DB6-5EE392E96C2C@piuha.net> Cc: IAB To: IANA Strategy , Stackevo , tech-plenary@iab.org, privsec-discuss@iab.org Message-Id: X-Mailer: Apple Mail (2.3273) Archived-At: Subject: [Privsec-discuss] Consolidation X-BeenThere: privsec-discuss@iab.org X-Mailman-Version: 2.1.22 Precedence: list List-Id: Privacy and Security Discussion List List-Unsubscribe: , List-Archive: List-Post: List-Help: List-Subscribe: , X-List-Received-Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2017 10:00:30 -0000 --Apple-Mail=_F57FCD3F-26CD-4347-B7BD-5B9761265289 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8 In the summer, the IAB briefly discussed the consolidation trends around = the Internet. Consolidation may take many different forms, for instance = in terms of traffic flows becoming more focused on large content = providers; consolidation in the ISP industry; drive towards fewer but = more popular operating systems or platforms; consolidation in the DNS or = CDN industry; dominance of popular applications and types of accounts = users have; limited sources for applications; and so on. We all probably recognise at least some forms of these trends. In = general, some of these changes are a part of the Internet becoming = globally commercial, the best solutions winning market share. But there = are of course some concerns as well, starting from the effect few = monocultures may have on security issues. Or to ensure openness, and the = ability to ensure that innovation continues to generate new, better = approaches in the Internet.=20 But it is worth distinguishing architecural issues from marketplace = problems. Obviously, much of this space is outside the scope of the IAB = and more in the area of competition policies and economics. But there = may be questions for the IAB as well, whether there=E2=80=99s something = that we should understand better, or perhaps document. For instance, = many of the moves towards consolidation are driven by economic factors = rather than technical factors, but that it may be worth studying to see = if there are any assumptions about the architecture of the Internet that = no longer hold true. Similarly, there might be research questions about = the state of the Internet that the research community should pay more = attention to. For instance, research on Internet traffic flows and how = those change wrt their diversity and/or concentration over time. As an = example, is there a more recent version of what we saw in 2010 at the = IETF 77 plenary: = https://www.ietf.org/proceedings/77/slides/plenaryt-4.pdf? = So, do the folks in the different programs have advice to the IAB in = this topic? In particular: 1. Do you see architectural issues within your own field that relates to = consolidation trends, and how those affect the Internet? 2. What potential new architectural structures might provide support to = either fighting the consolidation trend, or accelerating it? 3. Are there research programs that you believe would be useful in this = space, but are currently not being pursued? Which ones? Jari Arkko for the IAB --Apple-Mail=_F57FCD3F-26CD-4347-B7BD-5B9761265289 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8

In the summer, the IAB briefly discussed the consolidation = trends around the Internet. Consolidation may take many different forms, = for instance in terms of traffic flows becoming more focused on large = content providers; consolidation in the ISP industry; drive towards = fewer but more popular operating systems or platforms; consolidation in = the DNS or CDN industry; dominance of popular applications and types of = accounts users have; limited sources for applications; and so = on.

We all = probably recognise at least some forms of these trends. In general, some = of these changes are a part of the Internet becoming globally = commercial, the best solutions winning market share. But there are of = course some concerns as well, starting from the effect few monocultures = may have on security issues. Or to ensure openness, and the ability to = ensure that innovation continues to generate new, better approaches in = the Internet. 

But it is worth distinguishing architecural issues from = marketplace problems. Obviously, much of this space is outside the scope = of the IAB and more in the area of competition policies and economics. = But there may be questions for the IAB as well, whether there=E2=80=99s = something that we should understand better, or perhaps document. For = instance, many of the moves towards consolidation are driven by = economic factors rather than technical factors, but that it may be worth = studying to see if there are any assumptions about the architecture of = the Internet that no longer hold true. Similarly, there might be = research questions about the state of the Internet that the = research community should pay more attention to. For instance, = research on Internet traffic flows and how those change wrt their = diversity and/or concentration over time. As an example, is there a more = recent version of what we saw in 2010 at the IETF 77 plenary: https://www.ietf.org/proceedings/77/slides/plenaryt-4.pdf?<= /font>

So, do the folks in the different = programs have advice to the IAB in this topic? In particular:

1. Do you see architectural issues within your own field that = relates to consolidation trends, and how those affect the = Internet?

2. = What potential new architectural structures might provide support = to either fighting the consolidation trend, or accelerating = it?

3. Are = there research programs that you believe would be useful in this space, = but are currently not being pursued? Which ones?

Jari Arkko for the IAB

= --Apple-Mail=_F57FCD3F-26CD-4347-B7BD-5B9761265289--