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  • IETF 116 Yokohama registration now open

    Registration is now open for IETF 116 Yokohama

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    24 Nov 2022
  • IETF 115 post-meeting survey

    IETF 115 London was held 5-11 November 2022

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    22 Nov 2022
  • Catching up on IETF 115

    Recordings are now available for sessions held during the IETF 115 meeting and the IETF Hackathon, where more than 1500 participants gathered in London and online 5-11 November 2022.

      13 Nov 2022
    • Opportunities for university researchers and students during IETF 115

      The upcoming IETF 115 meeting in London on 5-11 November 2022 is a unique opportunity for networking researchers to learn how RFCs are written, to engage with the Internet standards community to begin to develop research impact, and to meet more than 1,000 leading technologists from around the world currently working in industry, academia, and other organizations.

        1 Nov 2022
      • Suggested IETF 115 Sessions for Getting Familiar with New Topics

        These IETF 115 meeting sessions are likely to include discussions and new proposals that are accessible to a broad range of Internet technologists whether they are new to the IETF or long-time participants.

          24 Oct 2022

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        IETF Hackathon in London

        • Charles EckelIETF Hackathon Co-chair

        17 Apr 2018

        IETF Hackathons began just over three years ago as a way of connecting Internet protocol development more closely with running code, and they have been growing ever since.

        IETF Hackathon in London Whole Room

        The IETF Hackathon held last month in London at the start of IETF 101 marked the fourth year of the event, with the first IETF Hackathon having occurred in 2015 before IETF 92 in Dallas. When IETF Hackathons started, we weren't sure what kind of interest there would be since it required arriving early and even more work by people who are usually already busy before and IETF meeting week. However, IETF Hackathons have steadily grown over the years, and the latest IETF Hackathon was the largest ever, with about 220 on-site participants, 20 remote participants, and 35 projects.

        It is hard to believe that the first hackathon was limited to just 50 participants!

        But more important than the number of people participating, or the number of projects, has been the way the work at the Hackathons has helped advance the work of the IETF more broadly. While the IETF's operating mantra has long included "running code", hackathons have brought that code closer to the standards-making process--not only physically and temporally, since hackathons have been held just before IETF meetings, but also because they have provided a more direct path for the lessons learned from implementation to inform the standards themselves. Rather than waiting for standards to be defined and then working on interoperable implementations, the IETF Hackathons encourage implementation in parallel with standards development in order to arrive at higher quality and usable standards more quickly.

        Over the past three-plus years, there have been many amazing project covering a lot of work underway in the IETF. One example has been the ongoing work to develop and test implementations of TLS 1.3. The IETF Hackathon in April 2016 was the first to have a dedicated TLS 1.3 project, and work has continued as a project organized at nearly every IETF Hackathon held since. Just ahead of the IETF 101 meeting last month, the TLS 1.3 specification was approved for publication as an RFC. There was also a TLS 1.3 hackathon project in London, this time led by remote participants - highlighting another exciting aspect of IETF Hackathons that have developed over time: You don't need to be in the main hackathon location to participate.

        IETF Hackathon in London project

        While the growth and evolution of IETF Hackathons over the past years have been amazing, we're already looking forward to the next event to be held in Montreal on July 14 and 15, at the start of the IETF 102 meeting. If you are involved in IETF work, or are looking for a way to get involved, consider participating in, or even leading a project. "Running code" is now undeniably more than a mantra within the IETF community, and IETF Hackathons are a great way to help "make the Internet work better".

        IETF Hackathon in London t-shirt

        Photos © Stonehouse Photographic/Internet Society


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