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  • IETF 111 Hackathon: Coding across time zones

    The IETF 111 Hackathon was held July 19-23, 2021. This was the 19th IETF Hackathon, and the 4th held as an online only event. For most people involved in the IETF the past several years, the IETF Hackathon marks the start of each IETF meeting.

    • Charles EckelIETF Hackathon Co-chair
    8 Sep 2021
  • IETF 111 post-meeting survey

    The results from our IETF 111 post-meeting survey are now available.

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    23 Aug 2021
  • IETF Community Survey 2021

    In May 2021, the IETF Administration LLC (IETF LLC) on behalf of the IESG and in collaboration with the IAB distributed the first annual IETF community survey to all 56,000 addresses subscribed to IETF mailing lists. Its purpose was "To help better understand our community and its makeup, gather views on the IETF and how well it works for participants, and gain insight into how we compare to similar organisations".

    • Jay DaleyIETF Executive Director
    11 Aug 2021
  • Experiences from the first fully-online IAB workshop on Network Impacts of COVID-19

    The Internet Architecture Board (IAB) held its first fully-online workshop in November 2019, just before the IETF 109 meeting, to discuss the network impacts of the COVID-19 crisis.

    • Mirja KühlewindIAB Chair
    23 Jul 2021
  • Applied Networking Research Prize presentations at IETF 111

    Presentations on research into network specification and verification and on low-latency video streaming will be featured during the Internet Research Task Force Open session of the IETF 111 Online meeting scheduled for 26-30 July.

      22 Jul 2021

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    Increasing capabilities of advanced automatic crash notifications

    • Randall GellensWorking Group Participant
    • Brian RosenWorking Group Participant

    8 Jun 2017

    Recently published IETF RFCs aim to expand the capabilities of such services, and to make them more broadly implementable.

    automated vehicle notifications banner

    Emergency calls placed by vehicles involved in a crash can provide significant benefit, especially when vehicle occupants are injured or unable to place a 9-1-1 call themselves. Sometimes called “Advanced Automatic Crash Notification” or “vehicle telematics”, the ability to automatically or manually place an emergency call when a vehicle is involved in a crash has been available for over two decades in the U.S., while the EU has a mandated system called “eCall” that is in the process of being deployed. Recently published IETF RFCs aim to expand the capabilities of such services, and to make them more broadly implementable.

    Current U.S. systems are proprietary; some use non-standard in-band modems to send vehicle location and crash data from the vehicle to a call center, which then relays the information to the Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP, also known as an emergency call center). The relaying is done either by non-standard out-of-band data transmission or orally by a service center agent. Other systems place a 9-1-1 call, play a prerecorded message to the PSAP call taker, and use text-to-speech to convey vehicle location and sometimes crash data. The EU eCall system uses a standardized in-band modem to convey vehicle location and crash data from the vehicle to a specialized PSAP, which has a corresponding modem to receive the data.

    The IETF has published two documents: RFC 8147 and RFC 8148 that specify how such calls operate using next-generation (all-IP) technology. Vehicles using these RFCs initiate emergency calls either manually or automatically in the event of a crash or other serious incident; the calls carry a standardized set of vehicle location and incident data. Such a call can be routed to a PSAP equipped for this, where the data can be automatically processed and displayed to a call taker at call assignment. During the call, the call taker can request that the vehicle send updated data or perform an action such as flashing its lights.

    The IETF developed a generalized mechanism for making data related to an emergency call available to the PSAP along with the emergency call. This mechanism, called “Additional Data”, RFC 7852, allows standardized data “blocks” to be sent in a SIP (RFC 3261) call, either as data in the body of an INVITE message, or as a URL sent in the header which, when dereferenced, yields the data block. RFC 8148 defines a data block for the U.S. “Vehicle Emergency Data Set” developed by the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO) and the National Emergency Number Association (NENA), while RFC 8147 defines a block for the eCall data set used in the EU. These RFCs also provide a mechanism for the call taker to request that the vehicle perform an action, such as honking the horn or flashing the lights to allow the responders to locate the vehicle.


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